Updating Our Roundup of Resources for 2012 Election Coverage


2:06 PM Nov. 02, 2012 — by Vicki Krueger

As the 2012 campaign heads into the final days, we're updating our list of courses and resources to help you--whether you're covering a national race, a state campaign or a local election.

Understanding and Interpreting Polls (2012 edition)
Find out why polling works, how to evaluate survey methods and what questions to ask about polls.
Enroll now in this free self-directed course

Election 2012 Reporting: Understanding Opinion Polls
Learn how to accurately evaluate and report on public opinion polls for the 2012 presidential election.
Watch the on-demand Webinar replay

How to Work with Campaign Finance Data
Learn how to use and understand campaign finance data, including producing simple data visualizations and maps using free tools.
Watch the on-demand Webinar replay

Political Fact-Checking: Tips and Tricks for the 2012 Election
Learn tips and tricks about political fact-checking from the editor of the Pulitzer Prize-winning website, PolitiFact.
Watch the on-demand Webinar replay

Reporting on Religion and Political Candidates
Learn best practices to execute solid stories about the faith of political candidates.
Watch the on-demand Webinar replay

Social Media and Your 2012 Election Coverage
Learn how political campaigns are using social media and what you need to know to deliver the coverage your community needs.
Watch the on-demand Webinar replay

Innovative Social Tools for Covering the 2012 Election
Bulk up your election coverage—quickly and with existing staff—by harnessing the social web.
Watch the on-demand Webinar replay

Resources for Reporting on Super PACs
The 2012 election is the dawn of the age of the Super PAC. Find out who is trying to influence voters' decisions, and the local and national implications of Super PACS. Resources from a reporting workshop sponsored by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.
See the complete list of resources

Resources for Covering Political Polls
Political polls play an important role in every election but can be tricky for journalists trying to determine their validity. Learn now to report on polls, factoring in ever-expanding technology such as automated polls. Resources from a reporting workshop sponsored by the Robert R. McCormick Foundation.
See the complete list of resources

What Journalists Need to Know & Explain About the Electoral College
How to explain the Electoral College and what happens in a "tie".
Read the complete Poynter.org article by Al Tompkins