Training Tip of the Day

Each day, Poynter's News University will share a tip, a suggestion or idea to help your reporting, writing, editing, photography, design, and multimedia work better. We'll draw tips from our more than 150 training modules. Follow us on Twitter with our #nutip hashtag. Or subscribe to our RSS feed.

  • #235
    Colors always live with other colors. They look different depending on what other colors surround them.
    Nov 07, 2010
  • #234
    If you are unable to select between the “good” and the “pretty good” research, it may because the focus of your story is still out of focus.
    Nov 06, 2010
    Writing
  • #233
    Portfolios are personal. They should make a statement about who you are and what your work is like.
    Nov 05, 2010
    Photojournalism
  • #232
    The engine for change in religious movements is often found in the neighborhoods, prisons, kitchens or bedrooms where religion is lived. What do people say about the issues at stake in the story when they're away from their house of worship?
    Nov 04, 2010
    Reporting
  • #231
    In order to increase findability on the Web, editors should pay close attention to headlines, which need to have enough information in them for Google to pick it up.
    Nov 03, 2010
    Online, Multimedia
  • #230
    Exit polls do something pre-election polls cannot do: Tell you why the election turned out the way it did.
    Nov 02, 2010
    Reporting
  • #229
    Whatever the architecture of your final story, it will be judged by three of its parts: the beginning, the middle and the end.
    Nov 01, 2010
    Writing
  • #228
    1 in 2 Americans live in city or town served by an independent, grassroots local news site.
    Oct 30, 2010
    Online, Multimedia
  • #227
    The Red-Blue divide is good for knowing who wins an election. It doesn't tell you why.
    Oct 29, 2010
    Reporting
  • #226
    Never refer to “the global warming debate” or the “climate change debate” and never write that the “debate is settled.” There is no single debate; there are separate debates within science, within policy and within economics, and about how scientific findings should guide policy.
    Oct 28, 2010
    Reporting